Frequently Asked Questions

>Frequently Asked Questions

CSX Railroad encourages all impacted citizens to reach out to them by using the following:

Report emergencies on the railroad: (812) 406-4588

General questions from the community: (812) 258-9523

Questions related specifically to CSX: 1-877-TellCSX (835-5279)

You may also learn more at the CSX website.  Click on “Indiana Service Enhancements” under the “Projects and Partnerships” section.

We agree that train horns are disturbing, particularly during nighttime hours.  The City of Columbus is pursuing several efforts to mitigate the effects of train traffic and “Quiet Zones”  are one of them.  When in place, Quite Zones allow the train engineer to forego using the train’s horn.

Without Quiet Zones in place, engineers are required by the Federal Railroad Administration to activate the horn multiple times for each crossing.  These requirements include:

  • Conductor must sound train horn 15 – 20 seconds in advance of public rail crossings
  • The standard pattern is 2 long, 1 short, 1 long blast
  • Each blast must be between 96-110 decibels

With four crossings in Columbus, the above requirements can make it appear that the train is sounding it’s horn during it’s entire trip through town. You can learn more about these requirements at https://www.fra.dot.gov/Page/P0889.

In 2018, as many as 22 trains will travel through Columbus per day.  This is a 300% increase from current train traffic.

The following intersections will be impacted:

SR11 & CR 200 S

SR11 & Spears Street

SR46 & SR11

Lindsey Street & Fifth Street

Lindsey Street & Eighth Street

Lindsey Street & 11th Street

SR46 & Carr Hill Road

SR46 & Johnson Blvd.

A citizen committee appointed by the Redevelopment Commission, working with our consultants from American Structurepoint, have identified six possible solutions to the intersection issue.  You can learn more about the options being considered at our Background page.

Yes.  The delays caused by the railroad are expected to result in an estimated $34.4 million in economic impact for our community.  This is due to many factors, including:

  • Workers being delayed getting to work, resulting in lost wages and productivity at businesses
  • Deliveries being delayed to businesses relying on regular shipments to due business
  • Delays in teachers and students getting to school on time if they live on the west side of Columbus
  • Delays in EMS services reaching those on either side of the impacted intersections and their transit time to and from hospital services

In short, the increase in railroad traffic will impact every citizen of our community in some way.

Due to Federal regulations and Homeland Security safety concerns, the railroads will not release the train schedules to the public.

The City is exploring ways to alert residents when a train is approaching Columbus and will share information if a solution is found and available to the public.

The best way to stay up-to-date on this issue is to visit this website, www.columbusrailroadproject.com.  We will be posting updates as they are available to share with the public.

You can also sign up for email updates via the City of Columbus email newsletter.

We will also be sharing the latest information with local media outlets.